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doglayingInwood Animal Center

At Inwood Animal Center, we are committed to delivering the best available veterinary medicine & are dedicated to serving you and your pet. Our goal is to exceed expectations with each and every interaction we have with our valued clients & beloved patients. We are a full service veterinary medical facility serving the animal healthcare needs of dogs and cats. For more than 40 years our highly skilled, compassionate staff of veterinary professionals have been providing exceptional animal medical care, combined with outstanding boarding & grooming services. We want to become your trusted source for all of your pet’s needs & we look forward to serving you for many years to come!

7 Things You Can Do to Make Halloween Safer for Your Pet

  1. Don’t feed your pets Halloween candy, especially if it contains chocolate or xylitol (a common sugar substitute found in sugar-free candies and gum);
  2. Make sure your pet is properly identified (microchip, collar and ID tag) in case s/he escapes through the open door while you’re distracted with trick-or-treaters;
  3. Keep lit candles and jack-o-lanterns out of reach of pets;
  4. If you plan to put a costume on your pet, make sure it fits properly and is comfortable, doesn’t have any pieces that can easily be chewed off, and doesn’t interfere with your pet’s sight, hearing, breathing, opening its mouth, or moving. Take time to get your pet accustomed to the costume before Halloween, and never leave your pet unsupervised while he/she is wearing a costume;
  5. Keep glow sticks and glow jewelry away from your pets. Although the liquid in these products isn’t likely toxic, it tastes really bad and makes pets salivate excessively and act strangely;
  6. If your pet is wary of strangers or has a tendency to bite, put him/her in another room during trick-or-treating hours or provide him/her with a safe hiding place;
  7. Keep your pet inside.

 

Importance of Wellness Exams

Veterinarians recommend regular wellness exams for the same reason your physician and dentist recommend them – if you can detect a problem in its early stages, it’s more likely to be treated and resolved with less expense, less difficulty and better success.

As the saying goes, an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. Vaccinations, heartworm prevention and routine deworming are important components of wellness care and can prevent diseases that are not only life-threatening, but very expensive to treat.

We can recommend a wellness program based on your pet’s breed (some breeds are predisposed to certain health problems), age, lifestyle and overall health.

Spaying and Neutering

Many pet owners opt to spay or neuter their pets, and spaying and neutering are important for reducing pet overpopulation.

Every year, millions of unwanted dogs and cats, including puppies and kittens, are euthanized. The good news is that responsible pet owners can make a difference. By having your dog or cat sterilized, you will do your part to prevent the birth of unwanted puppies and kittens. Spaying and neutering prevent unwanted litters, help protect against some serious health problems, and may reduce many of the behavioral problems associated with the mating instinct.

Removing a female dog or cat’s ovaries eliminates heat cycles and generally reduces the unwanted behaviors that may lead to owner frustration. Removing the testes from male dogs and cats reduces the breeding instinct, making them less inclined to roam and more content to stay at home.

Early spaying of female dogs and cats can help protect them from some serious health problems later in life such as uterine infections and breast cancer. Neutering your male pet can also lessen its risk of developing benign prostatic hyperplasia (enlarged prostate gland) and testicular cancer.

The procedure has no effect on a pet’s intelligence or ability to learn, play, work or hunt. Some pets tend to be better behaved following surgical removal of their ovaries or testes, making them more desirable companions.

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  • Inwood Animal Center

    Inwood Animal Center
    7611 Winchester Avenue
    Inwood, West Virginia 25428
    Ph: (304) 229-7387
    Email: info@inwoodanimalcenter.com
  • Hours
    Mon 8am-6pm
    Tue 8am-6pm
    Wed 8am-6pm
    Thu 8am-6pm
    Fri 8am-6pm
    Sat 8am-1pm
    Sun Closed
  • Big Spring Animal Hospital

    Big Spring Animal Hospital
    2279 Winchester Ave.
    Martinsburg, WV 25405
    Phone: 304-267-2909
    Email: info@inwoodanimalcenter.com
  • Hours
    Mon 8am-6pm
    Tue 8am-6pm
    Wed 8am-6pm
    Thu 8am-12pm
    Fri 8am-6pm
    Sat 8am-12pm
    Sun Closed
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